Spiced pork tenderloin, caramelised peppers, yoghurt & tahini dressing, and flatbreads

22nd May 2024Samantha Mattocks
Pork tenderloin flatbread yoghurt tahini

I love the flavours of the Middle East and this street food style recipe brings back memories of time spent in Jordan. Made using economical pork tenderloin from Old Hall Farm’s own rare breed pigs, which rests on flatbreads made using their Skyr-style yoghurt from raw milk from their Jersey cows. Add in the zing from the Lebanese spice rub and the bittersweet tang from the sour cherry molasses, and the taste of tahini in the dressing, and this is a truly delicious dish. Don’t be put off by the long list of ingredients – this really is an easy dish to put together.

INGREDIENTS (SERVES 4)
1 Old Hall Farm pork tenderloin*
1½ tsp Lebanese spice mix – I use Steenbergs**
½ tsp Fresh Herb Salt Company original Italian salt mix
3 tbsp Tuscan Farmshop extra virgin olive oil
200ml Old Hall Farm Skyr-style yoghurt
200g self-raising flour
1 tsp dried oregano
1 tbsp Yare Valley rapeseed oil
1 red & 1 yellow pepper, thinly sliced
2 tbsp sour cherry molasses – I used Belazu***
100ml Old Hall Farm Skyr-style yoghurt
2 tbps tahini
1 lemon, juiced
200g spinach, washed
To serve: Old Hall Farm Skyr-style yoghurt, sour cherry molasses, Yare Valley lemon infused rapeseed oil
Salt and black pepper, to taste

At least four hours before you want to cook the dish, if not the night before, take the pork tenderloin and trim to remove any sinews or fat. Mix the Lebanese spice mix and Italian salt mix together with the extra virgin olive oil and rub all over the pork. Put into a ziplock bag and set aside.

When you are ready to cook, pre-heat the oven to 180˚C fan.

Prepare the flatbread dough first, by putting the yoghurt, flour, oregano and a pinch of salt into a bowl. Bring together to a dough, then set aside for 15 minutes.

In a medium-sized frying pan, heat the Yare Valley rapeseed oil over a medium to high heat, then add the pork tenderloin. Sear on all sides, then put into the oven, in its pan, for 10-12 minutes until cooked through and has reached an internal temperature of 65°C. Remove from the pan and set aside to rest.

Start the caramelised peppers. Put a splash of rapeseed oil into a pan and place over a high heat. Add the peppers and stir well, then turn the temperature down after a few minutes. Cook for around 15 minutes, then add two tablespoons of sour cherry molasses and a good grind of black pepper. Stir well and continue cooking for another five minutes. You can add more molasses if you wish. Once cooked, set aside.

Make the yoghurt and tahini dressing by mixing together 100ml of yoghurt with two tablespoons of tahini. Add the juice of half a lemon and taste. If you prefer your dressing a little thinner, add more lemon juice.

Put the spinach into a pan and wilt. Press out as much water as you can, and set aside.

Make the flatbreads, divide the dough into six pieces. On a lightly floured surface, stretch and press each piece of dough out with your fingertips until they are around half an inch thick. Cook in a very hot griddle pan for around 1 minute on each side until golden. Remove from the heat and set aside.

Pork tenderloin flatbread yoghurt tahini

When you are ready to serve, slice the pork into thick slices. Put the flatbread onto a plate, then spread a generous spoonful of the yoghurt and tahini dressing on top. Add the spinach and caramelised peppers. Put slices of pork on top and then finish with a spoonful of extra yoghurt, a drizzle of Yare Valley lemon oil and sour cherry molasses. Tuck in and enjoy!

* Pork tenderloins vary in size, so look at what your butcher has. It may be that one large one will feed four easily, or they could be smaller, so you want two. Plus, there is then the advantage of any leftovers for the next day!

** You can use any spice rub you prefer – supermarkets have plenty of choice today, such as shawarma mixes or Old Bay Seasoning, both of which would work well with this dish.

*** You can use pomegranate molasses rather than sour cherry, or even balsamic glaze if you prefer although it won’t have the same piquancy.

© The Delicate Diner 2024

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